August 21st Science Heads Total Solar Eclipse TV Coverage

Not traveling to the path of totality?  You can watch the whole event on NASA TV.  Science Heads is helping NASA broadcast the eclipse live from Idaho Falls, Idaho.  Richard Stember will be manning our Mobile Observatory on location at the Museum of Idaho. NASA TV will be streaming live video from our observatory’s telescopes.  The coverage will include interviews and information about Science Heads and the eclipse.

Many cable and satellite services include the NASA TV channel in their lineup.  You can also watch the live stream from the official NASA eclipse website.

With safe solar eclipse glasses you will be able to see a partial eclipse from Southern California.  But for an idea of what a total solar eclipse is like – be sure to tune in to the live NASA TV coverage starting at 9:00 am PDT.  Idaho Falls coverage starts at 10:15 am PDT.

Locally the eclipse will begin at 9:05 am PDT.  Maximum is at 10:21 am and the eclipse ends at 11:44 am PDT.

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Upcoming Event – Michal Peri Talk on the Solar Eclipse in Placentia

Please join us for an evening of astronomy at the Placentia Library (pdf), this Tuesday, August 1st, from 7:30 – 9:30 pm! This is a free, public event.

Dr. Michal Peri will start the evening with a talk on the upcoming solar eclipse of August 21st (just three weeks away!), which will travel from west to east all the way across the U.S.

Following her talk, Science Heads will be hosting night-sky viewing in our Mobile Observatory, three fun science and art stations outside, and an interactive 3D tour of the solar system using NASA software and imagery.

The library is located at 411 E. Chapman Ave. Placentia, CA 92870

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Solar Viewing at Muzeo

Science Heads was at Muzeo in Anaheim, yesterday, for some solar viewing and public education about the solar eclipse, now only three weeks away.

The sun was very quiet during the event, with no visible sunspots or prominences, but we were able to see one filament.

Thank you to the people at Muzeo for having us come for a visit!

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Solar Eclipse Talk at the Mission Viejo Library

Solar eclipse talk.

Science Heads Executive Director, Richard Stember, gave a talk on the upcoming solar eclipse at the Mission Viejo Library in front of an audience of more than 70 people. The talk was well received, and Richard got many compliments from those attending.

Science Heads volunteers and board members held an event at the library afterward, focused on solar science and eclipse viewing. We really appreciated the interest, and the opportunity to answer many questions about the sun and the solar eclipse on August 21st.

Be sure to tune in to NASA TV for live coverage of the eclipse, including a broadcast of the eclipse’s progress from inside our mobile observatory! Richard will be driving the observatory to Idaho Falls, where he will connect our solar telescope to a live video feed.

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Lake Forest Camp Out

Science Heads was proud to participate in the Lake Forest Camp Out at the sports park, on the 15th.

After the last story was told around the campfire and the park lights were doused, we opened up our telescopes for viewing of Jupiter and Saturn. The “seeing” as the astronomers say, was spectacular for city viewing. We were able to see the Cassini Division in the rings of Saturn, and even get a glimpse of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.

We’ll be participating in future Lake Forest city events, so check in on our Event Calendar!

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Lake Forest Girl Scout Day Camp

A big thank you to the Lake Forest Girl Scouts for inviting us to their day camp at Irvine Lake! It was great talking to the Scouts of all ages. They asked great questions and would make excellent astronomers or other scientists.

Our crew spent the afternoon showing the Sun to the Scouts, and talking about the upcoming Great American Total Solar Eclipse on August 21st!

After a break for dinner, and after it got dark, we and the OC Astronomers opened up the ‘scopes for nighttime viewing of Jupiter and Saturn.

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Lake Forest Fourth of July Parade, 2017

Science Heads celebrates the Fourth of July by showing off our (freshly washed!) mobile observatory in the Lake Forest parade.

We had a great time today, waving, walking, and handing out over 1000 pairs of solar viewing glasses. Lake Forest is so enthusiastic for the eclipse that we ran out of glasses only part of the way down Lake Forest Drive. Sorry to have missed the rest of you, but if you’d still like a pair, ours were made by Rainbow Symphony in Reseda, are thoroughly certified as safe for sun viewing, and are only $1.95 in small quantities. NASA has a page with more information on finding quality sun viewing glasses and tips on safe sun viewing.

Finally, a huge thank you to our board members and super volunteers out walking the streets of Lake Forest on this very warm Independence Day!

We will add more pictures as they come in…

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Halecrest Swim & Tennis Club Camp Out

The night was mostly cloudy at the Halecrest Swim and Tennis Club, but we were still able to offer some looks at the moon and Jupiter as they emerged briefly from the clouds.

Meanwhile, in the mobile observatory, we were giving 3D tours of the solar system on the MOBS computer screens.

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Laguna Coast Wilderness Park Public Outreach

At the Nix Nature Center off Laguna Canyon Road we had a night viewing event with some of the OC Astronomers. A June marine layer clouded us out again, but we had 50 or so who visited our virtual solar system tour.

Thank you to the park visitors, volunteers, and staff for a fun evening! We’ll be back on October 28th for View the Moon night!

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Woodland Elementary Camp Out

A beautifully clear night in June at last! Our first time setting up the Mobile Observatory on grass had its challenges, but the night sky was worth it.

We had the solar system tour going at the back of the trailer for the group waiting to look through the telescope. For most of the night we were looking at Jupiter, which was spectacularly clear. Late in the evening Saturn got high enough in the sky that we could switch over and get a nice look at the rings.

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