Science Heads Observes the Eclipse from Idaho Falls and John Day

Members of Science Heads traveled to John Day, Oregon and Idaho Falls, Idaho to observe the total solar eclipse. It was the first total solar eclipse that most of us had the opportunity to experience, and was definitely worth the time and travel needed to see this amazing natural phenomenon.

Executive Director, Richard Stember took the Mobile Observatory on the long journey to the Museum of Idaho in Idaho Falls to broadcast the eclipse live on NASA TV. He was interviewed twice by the Fox channel out of Salt Lake City, UT.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) produced a video featuring our mobile observatory, which was seen during the eclipse coverage on NASA TV. Unfortunately only half of it was played during the live eclipse coverage because of a technical problem.

Meanwhile, Michal Peri organized an expedition attended by thirty people, including two other board members, James and Rebecca Hammond, to the town of John Day, Oregon. James was able to capture some images of the eclipse, which you can see at the end of the photo gallery, below.

All of us had an incredible time, and are making plans to seeing totality again! Get ready, everyone, because the next American total solar eclipse is April 8, 2024. (And if you just can’t wait, there are two in South America in 2019 and 2020.)

Upcoming Event – Michal Peri Talk on the Solar Eclipse in Placentia

Please join us for an evening of astronomy at the Placentia Library (pdf), this Tuesday, August 1st, from 7:30 – 9:30 pm! This is a free, public event.

Dr. Michal Peri will start the evening with a talk on the upcoming solar eclipse of August 21st (just three weeks away!), which will travel from west to east all the way across the U.S.

Following her talk, Science Heads will be hosting night-sky viewing in our Mobile Observatory, three fun science and art stations outside, and an interactive 3D tour of the solar system using NASA software and imagery.

The library is located at 411 E. Chapman Ave. Placentia, CA 92870

Solar Viewing at Muzeo

Science Heads was at Muzeo in Anaheim, yesterday, for some solar viewing and public education about the solar eclipse, now only three weeks away.

The sun was very quiet during the event, with no visible sunspots or prominences, but we were able to see one filament.

Thank you to the people at Muzeo for having us come for a visit!

Solar Eclipse Talk at the Mission Viejo Library

Solar eclipse talk.

Science Heads Executive Director, Richard Stember, gave a talk on the upcoming solar eclipse at the Mission Viejo Library in front of an audience of more than 70 people. The talk was well received, and Richard got many compliments from those attending.

Science Heads volunteers and board members held an event at the library afterward, focused on solar science and eclipse viewing. We really appreciated the interest, and the opportunity to answer many questions about the sun and the solar eclipse on August 21st.

Be sure to tune in to NASA TV for live coverage of the eclipse, including a broadcast of the eclipse’s progress from inside our mobile observatory! Richard will be driving the observatory to Idaho Falls, where he will connect our solar telescope to a live video feed.

Lake Forest Camp Out

Science Heads was proud to participate in the Lake Forest Camp Out at the sports park, on the 15th.

After the last story was told around the campfire and the park lights were doused, we opened up our telescopes for viewing of Jupiter and Saturn. The “seeing” as the astronomers say, was spectacular for city viewing. We were able to see the Cassini Division in the rings of Saturn, and even get a glimpse of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.

We’ll be participating in future Lake Forest city events, so check in on our Event Calendar!

Lake Forest Fourth of July Parade, 2017

Science Heads celebrates the Fourth of July by showing off our (freshly washed!) mobile observatory in the Lake Forest parade.

We had a great time today, waving, walking, and handing out over 1000 pairs of solar viewing glasses. Lake Forest is so enthusiastic for the eclipse that we ran out of glasses only part of the way down Lake Forest Drive. Sorry to have missed the rest of you, but if you’d still like a pair, ours were made by Rainbow Symphony in Reseda, are thoroughly certified as safe for sun viewing, and are only $1.95 in small quantities. NASA has a page with more information on finding quality sun viewing glasses and tips on safe sun viewing.

Finally, a huge thank you to our board members and super volunteers out walking the streets of Lake Forest on this very warm Independence Day!

We will add more pictures as they come in…

Laguna Coast Wilderness Park Public Outreach

At the Nix Nature Center off Laguna Canyon Road we had a night viewing event with some of the OC Astronomers. A June marine layer clouded us out again, but we had 50 or so who visited our virtual solar system tour.

Thank you to the park visitors, volunteers, and staff for a fun evening! We’ll be back on October 28th for View the Moon night!

San Mateo Campground Sky Watching

The sky was clear and full of planets and stars to look at, for our public outreach tonight. We joined the OC Astronomers for this event, and everyone had a great time, including the camp rangers.

Mobile Observatory Ribbon Cutting

Mobile observatory ribbon cutting

Our Mobile Observatory is officially open! At the Mission Viejo public library, and accompanied by speeches from mayor Wendy Bucknam, Science Heads Executive Director, Richard Stember, and other local dignitaries, Science Heads cut a ceremonial ribbon for the MOBS.

See the coverage from the Orange County Register.

Our celebration event featured science-themed stations demonstrating photosensitivity via make-your-own sun prints, leverage, rapid oxidation (burning) of steel, safe sun viewing, geometric patterns, blood composition, and jet propulsion.

Look at our events calendar for many upcoming events!

Come to Our Mobile Observatory Open House, April 10th, at the Mission Viejo Library!

Bring the whole family for a free afternoon of fun and educational activities!

Science Heads Inc. and the Mission Viejo Library are celebrating National Library Week with Free Science Activities.

The afternoon will begin at 12 noon with a ribbon cutting event for Science Heads’ new Mobile Astronomical Observatory. The observatory will then be open to the public from 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

A map is available on the event’s Yelp page.

Free activities include:

  • Safe Solar Viewing using the observatory’s specialized solar telescope
  • Explore the Solar System with NASA Interactive 3D Software
  • Fun science related activities for both children and adults

This event is appropriate for children 4 years and older and adults.

The Mobile Observatory was a hit in our first outing, at Lake Forest Elementary
The Mobile Observatory was a hit in our first outing, at Lake Forest Elementary