Science Heads Observes the Eclipse from Idaho Falls and John Day

Members of Science Heads traveled to John Day, Oregon and Idaho Falls, Idaho to observe the total solar eclipse. It was the first total solar eclipse that most of us had the opportunity to experience, and was definitely worth the time and travel needed to see this amazing natural phenomenon.

Executive Director, Richard Stember took the Mobile Observatory on the long journey to the Museum of Idaho in Idaho Falls to broadcast the eclipse live on NASA TV. He was interviewed twice by the Fox channel out of Salt Lake City, UT.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) produced a video featuring our mobile observatory, which was seen during the eclipse coverage on NASA TV. Unfortunately only half of it was played during the live eclipse coverage because of a technical problem.

Meanwhile, Michal Peri organized an expedition attended by thirty people, including two other board members, James and Rebecca Hammond, to the town of John Day, Oregon. James was able to capture some images of the eclipse, which you can see at the end of the photo gallery, below.

All of us had an incredible time, and are making plans to seeing totality again! Get ready, everyone, because the next American total solar eclipse is April 8, 2024. (And if you just can’t wait, there are two in South America in 2019 and 2020.)