Science Heads Are Spooky at Montevideo Elementary

Our Spooky Science program continues, this time at Montevideo Elementary School.

A great crowd turned out to see this event, our first time at Montevideo. The sky was cloudy, so we concentrated on the Mobile Observatory software, and all of our new spooky science stations.

The glowing stations outside were a big hit as always, and inside, the screaming cups and screaming balloons, spider sense webs, optical illusions, take-home experiments, and solar system size display were very popular. In the front of the school, our big, hands-on lever station got a lot of use, with students able to lift 70 pounds with one hand.

Thank you to our great volunteers for making this an amazing night out!

Debut of Spooky Science Program at Lake Forest Elementary

The fall season of Science Heads is under way with an event at Lake Forest Elementary School! We premiered our Spooky Science program, featuring our mobile observatory (MOBS), plasma sphere, exhibit of household materials that glow under UV-A (“black”) light, “blood” tub, optical illusions, spider-sense webs, and over twenty other great stations!

We were able to see Saturn through our telescope, and had quite a line of people taking a look. The MOBS also had live video from the International Space Station, and an outside display of NASA’s Eyes on the Solar System software.

We are just getting started on our Fall events. Stay tuned for more reports!

A big thank you to our volunteers who made this an outstanding event!

Solar Viewing at Muzeo

Science Heads was at Muzeo in Anaheim, yesterday, for some solar viewing and public education about the solar eclipse, now only three weeks away.

The sun was very quiet during the event, with no visible sunspots or prominences, but we were able to see one filament.

Thank you to the people at Muzeo for having us come for a visit!

Solar Eclipse Talk at the Mission Viejo Library

Solar eclipse talk.

Science Heads Executive Director, Richard Stember, gave a talk on the upcoming solar eclipse at the Mission Viejo Library in front of an audience of more than 70 people. The talk was well received, and Richard got many compliments from those attending.

Science Heads volunteers and board members held an event at the library afterward, focused on solar science and eclipse viewing. We really appreciated the interest, and the opportunity to answer many questions about the sun and the solar eclipse on August 21st.

Be sure to tune in to NASA TV for live coverage of the eclipse, including a broadcast of the eclipse’s progress from inside our mobile observatory! Richard will be driving the observatory to Idaho Falls, where he will connect our solar telescope to a live video feed.